Category: Digital Advertising

A Message to Advertisers: Don’t Google Yourself!

It’s a natural response – you’re paying for your ads to be seen by users and you want to see them too! What many advertisers fail to realize, however, is that searching for your own ads on a search engine can actually be harmful. It’s also a very inaccurate way of evaluating your ad’s performance.

When a user performs a search, keywords are not the only factor that determines if your ad will be displayed. There are a number of settings within the Google AdWords interface that determine whether your ad should be shown to a particular user:

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Landing Page Best Practices in the Real World

Pay-per-click advertising is an indispensable tool to have in your lead generation toolbox: not only does it increase brand awareness, but it brings qualified leads to your website. However, if a potential customer clicks on your ad after searching “new countertops” and is routed to your expansive homepage, you’ve immediately lost them. That’s where landing pages come into play – targeted landing pages help connect the right customers to your product, and allow you to capture information about those potential customers in order to follow up and complete the sale.

Landing Page Best Practices

A poorly-optimized landing page can cause you to miss sales and lose customers. Below, we’ve assembled a short list of best practices that will help eliminate confusion and drive conversions:

  • Display the form above the fold of the page
  • Make sure the form is not too long, include as few required fields as possible
  • Have one, clear call to action and place it prominently on the page
  • Include trust-building content such as videos, customer testimonials, satisfaction rates or company awards
  • Make sure the copy on the page is clear and succinct
  • Use directional cues to draw attention to your call to action
  • Give people the option of filling out a form or calling a direct line

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What Type of Story Are You?

It sounds like a bad pick-up line, but bear with me: knowing what your corporate story is, and what shape it should take, can boost your bottom line and create more warm fuzzies than you ever dreamed possible. Why is this? Because humans are social creatures; we’re hard-wired to connect with and love a good story.

When I was in college, I wrote a short play called “Broken Blinker” that won a national contest and played at The Kennedy Center. My play explored the complicated emotions surrounding the Vietnam War through the tale of two stoic Midwestern neighbors who struggle to fix a car blinker that won’t turn off. It took a complex issue and distilled it down to its essence for two ordinary people whose sons were in the war.

Big ideas – love, war, corporate values – become sticky when they’re packaged inside a compelling story. Which brings us back to your story. Which one(s) should your company tell? Here are some basic corporate story categories to get your brain storming:

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Google Victorious in Recent Class Action Suit

Recently, some people took exception to Google’s targeting of ads to Gmail users and filed a class action lawsuit suing Google for the violation of privacy. Google is able to offer Gmail for free because of its robust advertising revenue source. In fact, Google earned more than $50 billion in ad revenues in 2013 – an impression 16% increase over 2012. The Google Display Network, the largest display media network in the world, is successful due in part to the large number of publishers in the network and its targeting options for advertisers. More targeted ads receive more clicks, which pleases advertisers and results in more revenue for ad publishers. To help serve more targeted ads to users, Google automatically scans the content of emails for keywords that are used to display relevant advertising across the Google Display Network.

RepEquity Blog | Gmail Ad Example

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Using Adobe Analytics for Organic Search Keyword Reporting

With Google now limiting access to organic search keyword referral data, advertisers who use Adobe Analytics can no longer rely on Adobe’s standard natural search reports to identify the keywords that visitors use to enter the site. While Adobe Analytics still reports natural search terms from Bing and other engines, the gap left by the excluded Google data is significant and not usually covered by data from other sources.

The following sample Adobe Analytics natural search report is filtered to show only Google referrals. Notice that more than 80% of the organic search referrals are categorized as ‘keyword unavailable,’ and data is provided for only a few specific keywords.

Adobe Analytics Keyword Unavailable

To work around this limitation, Google recommends using data from Google Webmaster Tools, internal search, paid search and web analytics, including landing page popularity and traffic flow. To approximate the data in Adobe Analytics, you can use two reports: the Internal Search and Paid Search reports.

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